High Noon

You can listen to this whilst reading the post.   It might build the tension.

In the film, Gary Coopers character, Will Kane gets married and hangs up his badge.   On the day that he is leaving town he finds out that the dastardly Frank Miller is coming in on the noon train.    Will locked Frank up several years earlier and Frank is looking for revenge.    Will decides that he can’t leave the townsfolk in the hands of the Miller gang and so returns to face his destiny and asks the townfolk to help him.   The people of Hadleyville shun him though and Will has to face Frank and his cronies alone.  His new wife is a pacifist and vows to leave on the next train with or without Will.

The beauty of the film is that it is played back almost in real time (a bit like 24 but in black and white and with less torture) and you just can’t be sure that it is going to end happily.   I shall leave you to find it and watch for yourself.  It is 85 minutes of classic Western that you should make the most of.

Little Project faced its own High Noon.   I have been searching the world for the bits that I need to finish it off with no luck.   The time had come for me to either knuckle down and start making things or to put Little Project on the last train out of Shedville.

I wandered down to the shed to take stock.    There’s (still) a lot of wiring to do.    The brakes don’t brake.    The chain is too long and the engine does not start.   I’d made a complete mess of painting the tank and then in the process of pouring fuel into it last spring I had managed to take off half of the paint that I had put on.

I figured eBay was probably the best option.  A nearly finished project that had received a lot of love and was (in its own way) quite famous might actually tempt somebody with time on their hands.   I can even pass over the blog for the new owner to keep up the good work.   I think it will be important that the people who have taken the time to read this get to know how it all ends.

I was looking at the droopy chain and remembered that when I had picked up some of my fathers old tools a few years ago there was a chain link remover somewhere.   I thought I  might as well take a link out because it’s not a well known skill.    I took a link out and then another and the chain was nice and tight.   One less job to do for somebody.

Then I looked at the front brake which has defeated me for 18 months and thought “If I take that nut off and move that bit over there then it would probably make it easier to explain why it doesn’t work”.   So I took that nut off and thought about it a bit more and put the nut back on in a different place and then the brakes worked okay.

I thought I would take one last look at the wiring.   I went through my notes (still in the elephant hide book with the gold clip) and figured that the notes would be really useful for the new buyer as they were very comprehensive and it would take somebody new to the electrics a while to work them out, and how would they remember that purple was the new light blue?  Then I decided just to solder a few of the wires together so that it looked more tidy so I took the wiring loom up to the kitchen (nobody was in so it was safe), put David Bowie on the music machine and started soldering.

Then it was five hours later and I had remembered why I was restoring the bike.   I enjoy it.   I like the satisfaction of some little thing going right and I enjoy the interaction with the wonderful people on the internet who have encouraged me over the last 28 months (bloody hell!   It was going to be ready by my birthday in 2013).

And so we’re back.  From outer space.

It will be finished by my birthday.